Inter-activity: Abby Burgess

Customer-service site: JetBlue

Verb Set:

  • Insert “to” and “from” cities
  • Click departing and return dates
  • Select # of adults, kids, infants
  • Enter promo code
  • Sign in to TrueBlue
  • Search flights
  • Choose flights
  • Add baggage (checked/carry-on)
  • Enter personal information
  • Enter payment information
  • Purchase flights
  1. The user’s choices do make sense as the website it setup to only allow the user to continue to the next step if the prior step is completed. Also, the user is not required to login/create an account that eliminates steps. The website allows easy to read steps such as drop down menus of cities, calendars to select date, and lists of prices.
  2. Yes, the consequences of the users choices are dependent on each step taken to complete the goal (book the flight). After the user completes the flight into, they are brought to the list of options to search from available flights. The user is asked if they want to complete “extras” such as rent cars, book hotels, and add luggage. If they wish to do so, they are to add information and brought to a list of options. If they do not wish to do so, they may simply click continue.
  3. Yes, the user’s interactions have a meaningful impact on the story. The site is customized to the user’s needs as they choose dates, cities, and passenger numbers. The user can interact with the site and is brought to different sections based on their choices. The site is very straight forward considering the “search flights” box is on the home page of the site.
  4. The obvious types of interactivity are acquisition, communication, and exchange of information. Communication: the possibility of asking for “help” and “contact us”. Acquisition: exchange of money and personal information. Exchange of information: credit card info, personal information, etc.

 

Online/Casual Game: Temple Run (http://kbhgames.com/temple-run-2-online/)

Verb Set:

  • Begin game
  • Slide (down)
  • Jump (up)
  • Move (left/right)
  • Collect (coins)
  • Run
  1. The users choices are very straightforward as there are branches and gaps in the trail to jump, fire to slide under, and coins to gather on either the right or left. The actions are both apparent and logical based on the path the user is following.
  2. The consequences are either being chased or dying. If the user “trips” or makes a minor mistake, extra pressure is added to the user by having mummies chase the user. If a larger mistake is made the user simply dies.
  3. The game has very little narrative. The story is simply to continue to run as long as possible (to be honest I’m not sure there’s an end). The user’s interactions are with the character that determines whether he continues running or dies.
  4. Stimulus and response, navigation (simple) and control over objects, are the 3 main types of interactivity. The user must respond to the changes in the trail, control the characters movements, and navigate the trail as well.

Another site: Barstoolsports.com

Verb Set

  • Select “cities”
  • Select “featured, latest, or popular stories”
  • Log in/Sign up
  • Search site
  • Scroll
  • Click stories
  1. The Barstool website is extremely simple. The majority of stories are posted on the home page.
  2. The consequences of the user’s choices make sense. This website allows the user to read articles/gain information as they navigate the site.
  3. The consumer does not have to drive a narrative on this site as they can simply read one article and leave the site. The user’s interactions do not have a particularly meaningful impact on the story.
  4. Navigation and communication are the primary types of interactivity. The user navigates the site from article to article and is able to leave comments or like articles (communication).

 

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Interactivity: Alana, Marcus, Alexandria

Interactivity Exercise 

  1. Suncoast Credit Union 

https://www.suncoastcreditunion.com/ 

Verb Set 

  • Log in 
  • Join 
  • Branch and ATM Locator 
  • Contact Us 

Do the user’s choices make sense, and if so, how/why? Are they apparent, logical, etc? 

-In this case the user’s choices make logical sense and are simple to use. Navigation is set up with links to pages for information in order to see if you’d like to become a member. For instance, if you hit the personal tab it will link you to different options with information which offers more links to additional information if you have more questions.  

Do the consequences of the user’s choices make sense, and why/why not? 

-For a bank site, yes, the consequences do make sense. By clicking a navigation link, you are lead to information that it offers that you are looking for. Therefore, the consequences make completely sense in reference to the user’s choices on this particular site.   

In the case of your entertainment sites, do the user’s interactions have a meaningful impact on the story? 

-Does not apply. 

  • Stimulus and response 

The stimulus are the links to click (personal, business, contact us, ect.). The response is the information associate with each link to give more specific information 

  • Navigation 

Many links and drop-down menus act as the navigation across the site to get you to the pages you want/need to see.  

  • Control over objects 

Does not apply 

  • Communication 

No real communication save for a contact us link at the bottom. 

  • Exchange of information 

Use of questions, comments, and suggestions under the contact us link could be considered exchange of information in a way 

  • Acquistion 

The goal of this site is acquisition of information which is easily obtained by clicking and reading through the links.  

  1. Angry Birds 

http://freeangrybirdsgame.org/play/angry_birds_online.html 

Verb Set 

  • Sling 
  • Fly 
  • Hit (Stage Infrastructure) 
  • Move (Direction)
     
  • Do the user’s choices make sense, and if so, how/why? Are they apparent, logical, etc.,?
    Yes the users choices make sense. It’s simple: Sling birds, destroy infrastructure, if the infrastructure is not destroyed in its entirety, then the level must be repeated. So it’s, simulating and encouraging to complete it correct the first go-round. 
  • Do the consequences of the user’s choices make sense, and why/why not?
    The consequences of the user’s choices do make sense. If you do not reach the intend score to achieve then you must redo the level. If you do not destroy and or collect the prizes within the level you have to start from the beginning. It makes sense because if the objective is not met, then there shouldn’t be the option to move forward, making it more challenging as well as engaging for the users more. 
  • In the case of your entertainment sites, do the user’s interactions have a meaningful impact on the story.
    The users impact is detrimental for the progression of the game. If the user is sub-par or not to standards, then intern you become stuck (complacent)if the user is engaged and eager to proceed, then you can unlock new levels, new characters, and bigger prizes. 
  • Stimulus and response- by the actions in which you perform in the game it makes stimulus and response. Based on how you do or what you score it resonates with you mentally, to either do better or continue doing great. 
  • Navigation- the navigation is fairly simple. Arm the bird in the slingshot. Pullback the sling (in the direction you prefer the bird to fly), Hold down the mouse and sling. Release and shoot. Destroy the stage infrastructure through each successful sling (3). Increase score and move to next level. 
  • Control over objects- You can control the slings, toggle through different “Angry Birds”,  

Red
Chuck
Bomb
Matilda
Stella
Terrence
The Blues
The Hatchlings 

  • Communication- stages prompts notify that there is more infrastructure that needs to be destroyed. Score indicated in top corner.  
  • Exchange of information-n/a 

Acquisition- The goal of this games acquisition of information is easily obtained by user friendly-interactivity to the final stage. 

Are you in control on this game?
You are in full control of the game. Basically, your ability to understand that the quest to Leonard and the Pigs is stressful, but you can dictate how fast you get there and how well you do, by direct reflection of your user-friendly game play. 

  1. Netflix 

https://www.netflix.com/browse 

Verb Set 

  • Log on 
  • Choose which user you are 
  • Click “TV Shows” 
  • Choose “Trending Now” category 
  • Choose Riverdale 
  • Click Season 1: Episode 1 
  • Press play 
  1. Do the user’s choices make sense, and if so, how/why? Are they apparent, logical,etc.,? 

The user’s choices make sense because they go through exactly what an individual would do when they use Netflix. It might not be the same category of TV Shows or they may not pick Riverdale like I did, or they might even choose a movie instead, but essentially it is the same process of choices. With that being said, the user’s choices are apparent because it is clear that this is the same or similar path that all Netflix subscribers use. 

  1. Do the consequences of the user’s choices make sense, and why/why not?

The consequences make sense because with each step they are narrowing down their choices to get to the final decision of what TV Show or movie they want to watch. In the end, their final choice should bring them to the exact TV Show or movie they want to watch at that time.  

  1. In the case of your entertainment sites, do the user’s interactions have a meaningful impact on the story?

The user’s interactions have an impact on the story because each choice they make affects the ending consequence. There are thousands of different choices and endings that they could wind up choosing. It all depends on the specific choices they make throughout the process. 

  • Stimulus and response: the last choice the user makes is the stimulus and response because it is the end and therefore the user is happy with their decision and the movie or TV show starts and gives an optimistic response. 
  • Navigation: the options that are chosen that move the user through the Netflix website are considered the Navigation part of the website. 
  • Control over objects: Netflix does not have this category of interactivity 
  • Communication: Netflix does not have this category of interactivity 
  • Exchange of information: N/A 
  • Acquisition: The whole purpose of Netflix is Acquisition because the users receive “video” on demand. They acquire movies or TV Shows right away with the process that Netflix takes them through. 

Interactivity – Brittany, Gabi, Kelsey

Customer Service Site

https://www.jetblue.com/#/

Verb Set: click

  1. Yes. The login is large and on the left where the eyes naturally direct.
  2. Yes they make sense. When you sign in, it brings you to the page to buy plane tickets, also displaying your TrueBlue points. If you already have a flight and would like to view the boarding pass or manage it, there’s an easy tab called ‘Manage Flights’. This takes less than two clicks to get to. It’s very easy to get to the pages that most customers would want to navigate to while visiting Jetblue.com. The rest of the tabs are mostly informational.
  3. N/A

Identify as best you can the types of interactivity under the following categories:

  • Stimulus and response
  • Navigation
  • Control over objects
  • Communication
  • Exchange of information
  • Acquisition

 

Casual Game

http://andkon.com/arcade/puzzle/sugarsugar/

Verb Set: direct, send

  1. Yes. The mouse draws lines and pushes buttons. The game’s interactions are very intuitive and don’t require high levels of thinking.
  2. Yes. The lines drawn block the sugar’s natural path and direct it where the user chooses.
  3. The user’s interactions form the story in its entirety

Identify as best you can the types of interactivity under the following categories:

  • Stimulus and response: clicking and dragging makes a line that directs sugar towards desired mug, clicking the arrow button controls gravity.
  • Navigation
  • Control over objects: control the direction of the sugar to each mug
  • Communication
  • Exchange of information
  • Acquisition: move to next level based on success

 

Website of Our Choice

http://andkon.com/arcade/adventureaction/sushibar/

 

Verb Set: make and send

 

  1. Yes. In this game the user is the chef. Each choice the user (chef) makes is to make the consumer content with their sushi order. Each choice is in effort to prepare and present a sushi roll demanded by the consumers. Other choices consist of ordering more ingredients and referencing the recipe book to prepare new orders.
  2. Yes and no. Yes in the sense that preparing an order incorrectly the customer will not eat it. No in the sense that restarting an order means a loss of ingredients, which in turn means a loss of money because the chef will have to order more ingredients sooner. In reality, a chef would be able to put back the wrong ingredients because the order was simply being prepared.
  3. Yes, because the story is of a sushi chef keeping it’s patrons content. As long as the user (chef) completes the orders correctly and with speed then the consumers will be content.
  4. Identify as best you can the types of interactivity under the following categories:
  • Stimulus and response: delivering the sushi roll the customer demands.
  • Navigation: by following the recipe book, the user is able to complete and present the correct sushi roll demanded by the customer.
  • Control over objects
  • Communication
  • Exchange of information: customers think of the sushi roll they would like. The sushi roll the customer desires appears in a bubble above their head, which lets the user know what sushi roll to make and what ingredients to use.
  • Acquisition: the user is paid by each customer for each completed order. This money is used to purchase more ingredients. For every round the user has to acquire a certain amount of money from the customers in order to move on to the next round.

INTERACTIVITY- Kaylee, Anna, Kayla

INTERACTIVITY IN-CLASS EXERCISE- Kaylee, Anna, Kayla

  1. Customer service site – JetBlue.com

Verb Set-

Sign In or Register buttons are at the top corner of the home page.

Click Sign In. Taken to a new screen where you log in. Click Sign In. You’re taken back to the home page now signed in to your account.

For JetBlue’s website, you are given categories at the top to choose from.

Click on Plan a Trip.

Click on a departing city and location you are traveling to.

Click on a depart date, a calendar opens up and you select a date.

Click on a return date, a calendar pops up and you select a date.

Click on who is traveling, a drop down menu appears.

Click on 1 adult.

Click find it. You’re taken to a new window with a list of possible flights.

From possible flights, you select one and click on it. You then click continue at the bottom of the screen.

You’re taken the a new page. Type and fill out forms about the traveler. Click continue at the bottom of the screen.

New screen pops up with possible seat options for departing flight. Click on the seat you want. Click next flight. Possible seat options for return flight. Click on the seat you want. Click continue.

Screen with extras pops up. Select something or scroll past and click continue.

A window for payment pops up. Type and fill out forms for payment method. Click Purchase & Book Trip at the bottom of the screen.

  1. The user’s choices make sense. There’s really only one logical path to take, otherwise you won’t be able to book the flight. You have to keep moving forward and clicking continue in order to move forward with the booking process.
  2. 2. The consequences make sense. Once you have selected or filled something out, you are allowed to move onto the next page. If you forget to fill something out it will not let you move forward and will make you complete it.
  3. 3. Not applicable

The types of interactivity would be navigation and stimulus and response. Being a flight-booking site, navigation is important to get the user through all the steps to book their flight. There are a lot of ‘Continue’ buttons and new pages the user it taken to. Stimulus and response is used to ask the user what they want to fill out/select and then they respond by selecting it or filling in an answer. There is some exchange of information as well, as you have to enter things like your name, destination, date, credit card, etc.

  1. An online casual game or work of electronic literature–  textadventures.co.uk→ Who Among Us

Verb Set-

Play

Create

Help

Register, Login

Categories Search

Play Online

Start, Rewind, Restart, Share

Continue, various options/paths, go back, end

 

For each site, determine:

 

  • Every option that the user has makes sense and are logical. You have to read the passage and react accordingly, and the narrative shifts depending on your choices. They are all logical but they may take you on extremely different paths.
  • The consequences do make sense, because the goal of the game was to figure out the mystery- who was the killer? So, if you make poor choices within the game, you find yourself farther and farther away from uncovering the solution.

 

  1. All of the user’s interactions in Who Among Us are meaningful and have great impact on the story. The user has basically full control over each step taken, how the story will progress, and the overall outcome of the game. However, there were some options that were a “dead end” within the game- the creator rigged the options so although there were three, it inevitably made you choose one particular option. This made the user’s initial, reactive choice less meaningful because it was sometimes skewed in an alternate direction.

Stimulus and response as well as navigation are two main types of interactivity featured in the game Who Among Us. These are important for the function of this game because the user has free range choose their opinion and see results. Navigation is a major interactive component because users are limited to choosing options after each step, but move through the program in a free-form manner. The overall theme of the game is murder mystery, so each of these types of interactivity are essential to allowing the user to be rewarded through stimulus and response, as well as follow their opinion and reactions to control the game through navigation.

  1. Another Site- Your Choice- Yummly.com

Verb Set

Search, Forward, Back, Scroll, Click/Select, Type, Filter, Share (social media), Reset, Save, Order (ingredients), Comment, Thumbs up (comment), Flag (comment), Rate, Log In/Out, Zoom, Read (directions), Sort, Add to Collection

  1. Yes; the user is able to use filters to tell the website the ingredients he/she wants in the recipe as well as how much time the user would prefer to spend on the recipe.
  2. 2. Yes; as the user makes selections, the website narrows down options to offer the optimal recipes to the user based on his/her preferences.
  3. 3. Yes, the user’s interactions have a meaningful impact as the user guides the “narrative” by making choices that will lead to the end result: a list of recommended recipes.

Stimulus and response-

o Prompted to enter email to create account

o Prompted to select filters to narrow down recipes

Navigation-

o Back

o Forward

o Reset

o Click/select

o Search bar

o Scroll up and down page

o Generic search option bar: “Just for You”, “Seasonal”, “Popular Now”, “Quick and Easy”, “The Dish”

Control over objects-

o Click

o Save recipes

o Zoom

o Remove/add filter

Communication-

o Comment on and rate recipes

o “Contact Us”

o FAQs

o Share recipes on social media

Exchange of information-

o Sign up for emails

o Comments by users below recipes

Acquisition-

o Acquire recipes through filtration process

 

Interactivity Assignment, Mackenzie S., Mackensie S,. Marie D.

Customer Service Site – Spirit Airlines

Verb Set

  • Choose origin and destination
  • Choose dates of travel
  • Select number of adults/children travelling
  • Enter promo code
  • Click “search flights”
  • Choose departing flight time with price
  • Choose returning flight with price
  • Double check itinerary
  • Choose to add hotel or car
  • Choose to add on checked or carry-on bags
  • Click “continue without extras”
  • User can login, create an account or check-out as a guest
  • Enter personal contact information
  • Enter payment information
  • Confirm all information and click “purchase” to book flight
  • Login to personal email account
  • Receive confirmation email with travel code
  1. Do the user’s choices make sense, and if so, how/why? Are they apparent, logical, etc.,?

The user’s choices are logical and apparent because its the brings the user through the steps needed for the airline to book them a flight on a certain day for the number of travelers based on their choices made throughout the process. The site offers a user-friendly and step-by-step process for a customer to book a flight. The user does not have to create an account to purchase the flight ticket, they are able to check-out as a guest and proceed without any difficulties. The user makes choices based on specific reasoning and purchase their flight based on the choices they make throughout the process.

  1. Do the consequences of the user’s choices make sense, and why/why not?

Yes, the user is given responses and brought to different parts based on the choices they make. If a user selects a certain origin and destination and dates – they are brought to all of the available flights for that origin/destination on the specific day. If a user chooses to purchase a hotel, car or luggage, they are brought to a page where they are able to purchase those extras – if not they continue to purchase the flight. If a user wants to login or create an account, they are brought to a login page that asks for a username and password – if not they continue to purchase the flight as a guest.

  1. In the case of the customer service sites, do the user’s interactions have a meaningful impact on the story?

Yes, the site is user-friendly and the user is given many different choices to make throughout the site. The user is does not have to struggle to book their flight and the directions and steps are easy to follow along with. The user can interact with the site by making choices and then is brought to different sections of the site based on their choices. The user can customizable their choices to fit the needs and wants of the user booking the flight so they are able to have a flight to a particular destination on a specific day at a certain time.

  1. Types of Interactivity
  • Stimulus and response – the site stimulates the user to make their choices by asking where they want to go, where they are coming from, on what dates and the number of people travelling, etc. and needs the user to respond in order to give them flight options to choose from.
  • Exchange of information – the site needs travel information, personal contact information and payment information from the user in order for them to send the user a confirmation code for the flight the user wants to purchase
  • Acquisition – the site needs money in order for the flight to be purchased

 

Online/Casual Game
http://www.cubefield.org.uk/

  • User must click “agree” to allow Adobe Flash to be utilized for the game
  • User must use arrow to click “new game” after reading instructions
  • User is instructed to use the left and right arrow keys to move stylus around the cubes in order to stay alive
  • User is also instructed to press “p” on the keyboard to pause or “q” to change the quality of their screen
  • Once game begins user must follow along the path and dodge cubes by pressing the arrows left to right
  • If user hits cube they are directed to the main screen where they have the option to press “new game” or press “play more games” below

For each site, determine:

  1. Do the user’s choices make sense, and if so, how/why? Are they apparent, logical, etc.,?

The user’s choices are extremely apparent because there are limited options as to what the user is able to do. When entering the game there is only one option, to press “new game” so the choice to play the game is the only one that they have (they cannot enter another level, choose another difficulty level, etc.) Overall, the game interface is extremely straightforward and the user is always aware of the choice that they have while playing.

2. Do the consequences of the user’s choices make sense, and why/why not?

Yes, the consequences make sense because they follow the game rules and regulations. The instructions in the beginning of the game clearly state that you use the left and right arrow keys to move the stylus, and when the user presses them they correctly move to the right places. If the stylus hits a cube, then the game ends, a direct consequence that is also clearly outlined in the beginning of the game.

3. In the case of your entertainment sites, do the user’s interactions have a meaningful impact on the story?

The user’s interactions don’t have much meaning, because there is not really a defined story to this game. It is simply a game to test your reaction time while pressing the arrow keys and no characters or storyline are involved in the game interface.

Identify as best you can the types of interactivity under the following categories:

  • Stimulus and response

The stimulus in this game would be the cubes that appear in different formations for the user to dodge (using the area keys). The response is the user pressing the left or right arrow key in order to dodge the cubes.

  • Navigation

The navigation in this game is extremely restricted because the only controls are the left and right arrow keys. The game can be paused by using the “p” key and quality of the game can be changed using the “q” key. However, only the 4 keys are acceptable forms of navigation.

  • Control over objects

The only object that the user can control is the stylus (arrow) that is in a linear fashion, in order to dodge the cubes.

  • Communication

There is no form of communication or dialogue in this game.

  • Exchange of information

There is no exchange of information in this game.

  • Acquisition

The only thing that the user is able to acquire through this game is points that go up as more cubes are dodges. As the user successfully dodges more cubes, the more points the user is able to acquire. However, at the end of the game the only option is to start a new one, so the points go away following the end of the game.

Website of Choice- Facebook

-Log on to your Facebook account
-Brought to dashboard page
-Post content by clicking “add status” on dashboard page
-Scroll down on dashboard to view friend’s statuses, updates
-Click on friend’s icon to view full personal profile consisting of statuses, repost of pictures, videos, articles
-Click on your own icon to view your personal profile
-On dashboard page, down the left side hit settings to edit personal information like relationship status, place of residence, age, birthday, employment
-Update profile picture by clicking on your profile picture when viewing your personal profile, the option will appear on your old picture.

Do the consequences of the user’s choices make sense, and why/why not?

Yes, the consequences of the user’s choices make sense because they are ultimately inflicted purposely. Someone who wants to repost content from a friend will thus “repost,” or “share,” the image or video that they believe is interesting to allow for their friends to also possibly find interest in the content as well. People update profile pictures, public information like relationship status, employment, place of residence to inform their friends of where they are at in terms of the time in their life, showing intent and need to update others something important to the user, furthermore the consequences from sharing this information can be viewed as people becoming informed of the users life information and the user becoming informed of other’s life information in order to satisfy their interest in other’s lives, events both on a local and global scale, and news.  The users choices are both apparent and logical due to the user having a specific reasoning behind their actions when selecting either to view their own profile, whether it is to update their status, relationship, location, post content, edit content, view other’s profiles, statuses, content, etc. Each of these choices are guided for users too. Users are prompted and ensured about their tasks and whether or not they want to sign out, view content, repost content, post a status, delete a status, add a friend, message a friend, and accept messages from others.

In the case of your entertainment sites, do the user’s interactions have a meaningful impact on the story?

The users interactions have a meaningful impact on the story because depending on what a user decides to do when signing into their Facebook page, whether it is to update their personal profile, add friends, send messages, view content, post statuses, catch up with others, each interaction produces a different outcome on a deeper personal level. Lets say a user adds a friend, with adding that friend, a new connection is formed and potentially strong bond that may not have existed before could arise due to similar interests within each users content sharing, statuses, pictures, the list varies. Adjusting one’s personal profile adds meaning to what they are trying to portray to their friends and other viewers of their profile, whether it is a professional image, fun image, etc. Each version of users profile preference shows how great of an impact the decision to portray oneself in a particular light has on how one is viewed.

The types of stimulus used when navigating this website are communication and acquisition. The user is acquiring information, both personal and informative, about news, events, other friends, updates, etc. The website, Facebook is also acquiring its members by getting them to sign up in order to stay in touch and be brought up to date with information. Communication is relevant due to comments on videos, posts, pictures, and various other shared and posted materials by users.

Interactivity- Alana, Alex, Marcus

Interactivity Exercise

  1.  Suncoast Credit Union – https://www.suncoastcreditunion.com/

 Verb Set:

  • Log in
  • Join
  • Branch and ATM Locator
  • Contact Us

For each site, determine

  1. In this case the user’s choices make logical sense and are simple to use. Navigation is set up with links to pages for information in order to see if you’d like to become a member. For instance, if you hit the personal tab it will link you to different options with information which offers more links to additional information if you have more questions.
  2. For a bank site, yes, the consequences do make sense. By clicking a navigation link, you are lead to information that it offers that you are looking for. Therefore, the consequences make completely sense in reference to the user’s choices on this particular site.
  3. Does not apply.

 

Identify as best you can the types of interactivity under the following categories:

  • Stimulus and response

The stimulus are the links to click (personal, business, contact us, etc.). The response is the information associate with each link to give more specific information

  • Navigation

Many links and drop-down menus act as the navigation across the site to get you to the pages you want/need to see.

  • Control over objects

Does not apply

  • Communication

No real communication save for a contact us link at the bottom.

  • Exchange of information

Use of questions, comments, and suggestions under the contact us link could be considered exchange of information in a way

  • Acquisition

The goal of this site is the acquisition of information which is easily obtained by clicking and reading through the links.

 2.  Angry Birds – 

Verb Set

  • Sling
  • Fly
  • Hit (Stage Infrastructure)
  • Move (Direction)

 Do the user’s choices make sense, and if so, how/why? Are they apparent, logical, etc.,? Yes the users choices make sense. It’s simple: Sling birds, destroy infrastructure, if the infrastructure is not destroyed in its entirety, then the level must be repeated. So it’s, simulating and encouraging to complete it correct the first go-round.

  • Do the consequences of the user’s choices make sense, and why/why not? The consequences of the user’s choices do make sense. If you do not reach the intend score to achieve then you must redo the level. If you do not destroy and or collect the prizes within the level you have to start from the beginning. It makes sense because if the objective is not met, then there shouldn’t be the option to move forward, making it more challenging as well as engaging for the users more.
  • In the case of your entertainment sites, do the user’s interactions have a meaningful impact on the story. The users impact is detrimental for the progression of the game. If the user is sub-par or not to standards, then intern you become stuck (complacent)if the user is engaged and eager to proceed, then you can unlock new levels, new characters, and bigger prizes.

 Identify as best you can the types of interactivity under the following categories:

  • Stimulus and response- by the actions in which you perform in the game it makes stimulus and response. Based on how you do or what you score it resonates with you mentally, to either do better or continue doing great.
  • Navigation- the navigation is fairly simple. Arm the bird in the slingshot. Pullback the sling (in the direction you prefer the bird to fly), Hold down the mouse and sling. Release and shoot. Destroy the stage infrastructure through each successful sling (3). Increase score and move to next level.
  • Control over objects- You can control the slings, toggle through different “Angry Birds”,

Red

Chuck

Bomb

Matilda

Stella

 Terrence

The Blues

The Hatchlings

  • Communication- stages prompts notify that there is more infrastructure that needs to be destroyed. Score indicated in top corner.
  • Exchange of information-n/a

Acquisition- The goal of this games acquisition of information is easily obtained by user friendly-interactivity to the final stage.

Are you in control on this game? You are in full control of the game. Basically, your ability to understand that the quest to Leonard and the Pigs is stressful, but you can dictate how fast you get there and how well you do, by direct reflection of your user-friendly game play.

 

  1. Netflix – https://www.netflix.com/browse

 For each site, work up a “verb set” of actions that can be performed by the user on the site. Be as specific as possible.

  • Log on
  • Choose which user you are
  • Click “TV Shows”
  • Choose “Trending Now” category
  • Choose Riverdale
  • Click Season 1: Episode 1
  • Press play

Interactivity: Page and Alberto

Interactivity Exercise: 

Customer Service Site: WellsFargo.com

Verb Set:

  • Personal, Banking, Checking Account, Saving Account and CD’s, Debit Prepaid Cards, Online Banking, Online Bill Pay, Transfers, Credit Cards,
  • Checking Accounts, Please set your location, Compare All Accounts,
  • Online Banking, Enroll Now, Sign On
  • Online Bankings, Manage Accounts, Transfer and Pay, Mobile Features, Financial Planning, Download Our App
  • Customer Service, General Banking, Send a Secure Email, Mailing Addresses, Emergency Numbers, Make an Appointment, Contact us Internationally
  • ATMs/Locations, Find a Wells Fargo Location, Bank Only, ATM, Drive up Bank, 24 hour ATM
  • Sign On, Username, Password
  1. The users choices do make sense. The website is separated into three general categories Personal, Small Business, and Commercial. As we are students we explored mainly the personal side of it which has a variety of account choices from checking to credit cards. Choosing the type of account is generally what will be the most important to the buyer so these are convenient choices. On the top are the most common options for individuals who are already customers sign in, ATM location, and language options. These are at the top and convenient if you do not need to navigate the site.
  2. The consequences make sense. In order to sign up for an account they first request your location to ensure they are local to the individual and will be convenient for them, so that is a logical and necessary consequence. In order to sign in you have to create an account or be a member, so that is an obvious consequence. And the intricate details necessary to decide the appropriate account make sense.
  3. The site appears easy to maneuver when necessary, and there are a wide variety of options specific so the customer does not have to try hard to find the information they desire. I think this site would be very helpful and meaningful if you need to open a bank account of any kind.
  4. The most obvious type of interactivity would be communication, acquisition, and exchange of information. Communication in that the bank has to provide a lot of information to the consumer in order for them to understand the company and the bank account of their choice. Acquisition as it is taking your money and your personal information, the website is asking you to become a member of their company. And exchange of information is very necessary as they require very personal information in order to open a bank account.

Media Site: ESPN.com

Verb Set:

  • NFL, NBA, MLB, NCAAM, Soccer, Pyeongchang 2018, Other Sports
  • Watch, Listen, Fantasy
  • TopEvents, Calender, Score, Summary
  • Quicklinks, Pyeongchang 2018, bracketology, MLB Spring Training, Fantasy Baseball;sign up
  • NBA, Score, Schedule, Standing, Stats, Teams, Players, Power Ranking, All Star 2018
  • Log in, Username, Password, Sign Up
  • Search
  1. The ESPN website is a bit overwhelming to the consumer, there are a lot of tabs and a lot of different ways to acquire the same information. However, the basis of the website is to cover all sports, so naturally there is a lot of information. In reference to finding information about the specific sports, the choices make perfect sense. In addition, the strip at the top of the website provides quick information in real time, so thats very logical and convenient.
  2. The consequences of the choices make sense. It allows the consumer to get more specific information when they maneuver through the various sports tabs. We are unaware what happens when the consumer logins into the site as we are not member, but a true sports fanatic would seem to benefit from the vast content on the site.
  3. The consumer does not have a necessarily drive a narrative on this site, however, there is the option to comment and interact with the narrative. There are live threads and discussion boards for consumers to communicate but they are obviously not in control.
  4. The types of interactivity that dominate ESPN are communication and acquisition. The consumer is acquiring sports information and the website it acquiring members. The communication concept comes from the discussion and comment threads. This site was the least interactive of our three because its main goal is to provide information rather than attract a consumer.

Online Casual Game: IQ Ball ( https://www.coolmath-games.com/0-iq-ball )

Verb Set:

  • Goal: Grab the red target with your spike
  • Aim, Shoot, Grab, Punch
  • Click and hold to grab the target
  • Restart, Pause, Menu, Sound
  • Menu, Select Level
  1. The users options do make sense, however, they are not always apparent. Part of the trick of the game is problem solving so the consumer must make decisions to acquire the red target. There are cues from the game as to the best way to get to the red target though.
  2. The consequences do make sense. If you grab an object it pulls the player towards it, if you let go in the air the player fly’s, and if you pull on a loose object it brings it to the player. The game does not explain the options or the consequences of the actions to the player, as it is part of the game. For the most part after the first level the player has to figure it out for themselves.
  3. The game has very little narrative so the actions are not necessarily meaningful. However, the player must acquire the target prior to advancing the next level, so its meaningful if they want to continue.
  4. The types of interactivity will be stimulus and response and control over objects. Stimulus and response because the player must make quick decisions to grab onto things as objects move, there is a stimulus and they must respond. And the more important interactivity is control over objects as they are responsible for their player and must punch and grab objects to acquire the target.